Read: Bobby Orr Says That Everyone Should Be Ashamed

In the Globe and Mail, James Mirtle spoke with Bobby Orr about the lockout.

Orr says that the two sides need to accept the responsibility that they have and get the deal done.

“Shame on them if they don’t do that.”

On the issues that the lockout presents in the long run, Orr told Mirtle“I don’t know [if there’ll be] long-term damage if we get it going. I think we can get it going. But anytime there’s a lockout, there’s damage. You’ve got to hope your fans come back. I think they will. But to even think about losing a season, that would hurt.”

Orr is now an agent and his agency represents Marc Staal and Brian Boyle.




26 comments
Hanknaples
Hanknaples

Bent, 


You keep mentioning that Harrison was uncharacteristically driven off the line on a couple of plays. He was anchoring the line the entire game and responded after Richardson was stonewalled at the line of scrimmage. Go back and look at 8:32 in the first quarter and you see Richardson actually DRIVEN back into the 2nd or third level by Urbik and Cordy Glenn. Glenn had a field day yesterday with Richardson. Richardson should have dominated the left side of the Bills offensive line but instead he was stonewalled and when he had a chance to make a play case in point the first offensive play for the Bills he looked like Pouha making a tackle after being pushed back off the line by the lineman who continued to move up the field to give Bryce Brown room and he Richardson tackled Brown who doesn't have the north to south physical running style from behind 3 yards down the field . If you go back and look at 5:43 in the first quarter Glenn finished a block by going low at Richardson's legs THAT is how lineman are taught to finish. So whenever Richardson puts his hands up to get the attention of the referees it is not because the low block is illegal it is because he is frustrated and soundly beaten by his opponent. What Glenn did on that play is what defensive tackles simiarly do when they grab the lineman's jerseys throw them to the side, and smack them on their helmet or push them to the side with both hands. WHen it gets physical in the trenches Richardson typically loses the battle. This is proven because once he makes a play like he was able to do in with less than 7 minutes to go in second quarter he runs his mouth to the other team. Where was that in the first series Richardson? Another point was in the second half with another tempo setting drive from the offensive line of the Bills to the defensive line of the jets. With 10:09 left in the third quarter Erik Pears and Seantrel Henderson drove Richardson back AGAIN from the right side of the offensive line. This was twice in one game. Their was no way that Richardson was going to dominate the offensive line of the Bills. He is responsible for getting through the offensive line and disrupting the play and he didn't. Again he was literally driven back to second and third levels of the defense. Then with less than 2 minutes to go in the third quarter he makes a tackle for loss and runs his mouth again to the offensive line. Where was that early in the third quarter when he had an opportunity to set the tone for the second half? He was dominated again. Then with 16 seconds left in the quarter he is pushed back by Glenn again after the Bills run to Wilkerson's side. This is where the jets need the physicality in the trenches, the staple of a dominant defensive line and Richardson isn't reciprocating the play Wilkerson and Harrison. 


  Interested Jet 

J. Smooth
J. Smooth

I'm a science guy, so I tend to look at the Jets from that kind of perspective. This season has been puzzling in a lot of different ways. 


First, on the basis of assigning blame, here's how I look at it: The Jets are 1-7, but I absolutely would argue that they're much more talented than any of the other 1-7 or 0-7 teams, and are more talented than various 2 or 3 win teams, such as Tennessee, St. Louis, Atlanta, Minnesota, or Washington. Their talent level is that of probably a 3-4 win team. So, clearly there is a disparity between the talent Idzik has provided, which isn't great, and the product on the field. I'm not saying that Idzik didn't leave holes on the roster, but he certainly provided a team better than what has been shown. Why is this disconnect occurring?


The first answer I'd probably get is Quarterback play. That's fair. Statistically, Geno is at or near the bottom in just about every major category. No getting around that. But why is this? This guy was an extremely talented kid coming out of WVU, and showed, in brief flashes, that he knows how to move an offense at an NFL level. He has quality arm talent and athleticism, and while his intangibles are obviously questionable, the same could be said for a lot of other QBs who have had more success than he has. In theory, he should be a perfect fit in Marty's offense. Why is he failing? Well, when a talented QB can't seem to make marked improvement from his rookie mistakes, his preparation is called into question.


But we can't talk about Geno's lack of progression without mentioning the alarming trend: that this is the same thing we saw with Mark Sanchez, only rapidly sped up. Like Sanchez, Geno struggled early, but found some success later only to see it all regress on him as time went by. Only, for Smith, it happened over 2 seasons instead of 4. Both QBs were highly touted, talented kids coming out of college that never seemed to develop past their abilities in college. All of this points at an inherent flaw in their preparation, and by extension, a flaw in how they're coached. 


Since Marty was not there for Sanchez's demise, obviously Marty can't be at fault, here. The only constant along the staff with Sanchez and Geno is Rex. We all know that Rex tends to be pretty laissez-faire with how his offense progresses, but maybe that's just the tip of the iceberg. Perhaps it's the way that he practices and prepares his players that is causing this lack of progress at the Quarterback position. In that regard, even though I love him, I think Rex needs to go. 

t__k
t__k

Sheldon Richardson had a monster game.

johnsec125
johnsec125

Idzik looks like a grown up Napoleon Dynamite in the photo above.

a57se
a57se

Geno Smith, QB: -5.9

Breakdown: Geno Smith only attempted eight passes. To achieve that kind of grade on just eight passes is some kind of all-time mark for futility at PFF. He was sat down after his third interception of the game or who knows how bad it could have been.

Signature Stat: Completed more passes (three) to Buffalo players than he did to his own teammates (two).

Michael Vick, QB: -4.8

Breakdown: Benching Smith was definitely the right move, but this grade from Vick should caution against too much celebrating from Jets fans. Vick made a couple of plays but made far more mistakes, and barely graded better than the man he replaced, albeit on far more snaps.

Signature Stat: Had a passer rating of just 14.6 when pressured.

PFF grades for the Jets QB's...

a57se
a57se

That GIF is funny, but I liked the Lansannah one even better!

a57se
a57se

Damon Harrison is clearly the culprit responsible for the HORRIBLE SECONDARY!


Bent
Bent moderator

@Hanknaples


I watch every play as least five times and recap the game accurately every week.  I don't need to go back and watch any plays.


In conclusion, Richardson was getting double teamed a lot and made a couple of plays after which your complaint was "why didn't he do this earlier"?


And if anyone on this team ever looks like Sione Po'uha, that's a good thing.


Wilkerson and Richardson were excellent yesterday.  Harrison was non-descript by his standards.  Picking out a couple of plays that I've already watched and accounted for in my analysis doesn't change that.


Richardson had nine tackles yesterday.  When Harrison did that you went on and on about how Po'uha could never do that (even though he had) and when I tried to tell you tackle numbers were not an accurate reflection of a defensive tackle's performance anyway you disagreed.  So, which is it?  Was I right before and Richardson's nine tackles are not-necessarily-indicative of his actual performance or am I right now and Richardson played well, as evidenced by the tackle numbers you yourself claim are oh so important.


(Spoiler alert: I'm right both times).

Hanknaples
Hanknaples

@t__k


His mouth (Richardson's)  had a monster game. He was late again to make an impact. The tempo was already set by the time he could bask in his glory. He was dominated by both the left guard and left tackle, and the right guard and right tackle. 


Interested Jet

a57se
a57se

@t__k 

Demario Davis actually had a nice grade by PFF...+4.6, IIRC.

Hanknaples
Hanknaples

@Bent


The point I made was that Harrison was still there in the middle of the action knee deep in the mud with the Bills interior offensive line. Richardson was stonewalled and was hanging around either the line of scrimmage or he was being pushed either away from the quarterback on running plays or pushed back into the second and third levels of the defense. I pointed out at least three different times during the game when it occurred. If don't want to accept it it is your problem but it is fact. Your analysis is skewed to Richardson and Wilkerson and you defend him despite being completely inferior this year to his competition. He has had excellent play around him as Harrison and Wilkerson continue to produce despite not being reciprocated by another defensive lineman.They are in mid-season form while RIchardson hasn't been a factor this season. All the sacks and tackles for loss this season from Richardson have been after the tempo by the defense has been set. IT IS HIS JOB TO DISRUPT THE PLAYS! He has to get there first not last. You are the one who has said pressures or hurries are equal to sacks in this defense. It is a comment that is so one sided and irrational that it feeds the machine of why the jets continue to make the same mistakes every week on defense. Pouha always could not make that one impactful play that a nose tackle has to make to give the rest of the defense a chance to dominate and to get off the field when they have to. Nine tackles don't mean a whole lot if he is making six of them after the runningback has room to make moves along the line of scrimmage and he has a wall of bodies blocking around him and in front of him. That is chaotic for the defense not the offense. 


Interested Jet

J. Smooth
J. Smooth

@a57se @J. Smooth Well, I wasn't sure if there was anyone on the last thread, and since I put some time into writing it I figured I wanted to put it on the active one. 

Bent
Bent moderator

@Hanknaples


So now you're saying he was quadruple teamed!  No wonder Davis had such a good game.

t__k
t__k

@a57se @t__k You think they resign Harris next year?



As I type that I realize it's a stupid question...who knows what they do next year, but I see MLB as an issue for them next year at this point in time.

Bent
Bent moderator

@Hanknaples @Bent


"Nine tackles don't mean a whole lot if he is making six of them after the runningback has room to make moves along the line of scrimmage and he has a wall of bodies blocking around him and in front of him."


This is correct.  However, it is utterly inaccurate when it comes to Pouha.  Once again you a desperately inventing reasons to criticize Po'uha that are provably false.


They track this by keeping a record of stops and calculating the run stop percentage, thereby filtering out which players are racking up high tackle numbers without making any tackles near the line of scrimmage.


Neither Damon Harrison (leading the league this year, 2nd last year), Kenrick Ellis (led the league last year, would be leading again this year but hasn't played enough run snaps to qualify) nor Po'uha (2nd in 2011, 3rd in 2009, 1st in 2007 with the highest run stop percentage since records began) fall into this category.


No, pressures are not as important as sacks, but they are still very important.  Don't misquote me.


Keep criticizing Richardson, who is playing even better than last season (I wish we could say the same thing about Harrison).   It's hilarious.

a57se
a57se

@t__k 

they haven't drafted anyone worth replacing him so they probably have to bring him back for a lot less money or find someone in FA.

Hanknaples
Hanknaples

@Bent


No you said specifically that pressures are equally important as sacks pertaining to this defense. Run stop percentage doesn't mean anything when when he is clearly getting dominated physically at the line of scrimmage. The stats can be padded up throughout the game but the tempo is already dictated by then. If the jets defense doesn't establish itself with physical play then it will be a long day for the jets and this is what has happened. The only difference between last year and this year is that the rest of the nfl is prepared to attack the defense that rex ryan has with his abomination of 4 defensive tackles at the line and they won't let richardson impose himself which has already been done and then they are are in the process now of taking him out completely. I said nine tackles don't mean a whole lot if he is making six of them after the runningback has room to make moves along the line of scrimmage and he has a wall of bodies blocking around him and in front of him in reference to Richardson not Pouha so I don't see how you are trying to spin this in the direction of Pouha. I think you are starting to get tired Bent. Richardson should be relegated to second string behind Harrison and Coples moved back to his original position next to Harrison. 


  Interested Jet  

a57se
a57se

@brendan @a57se 

Hmmm...I thought the press conference was 12:30 pm not 1:30...oh well.


Hanknaples
Hanknaples

@Bent


Pouha like Richardson made his tackles either from behind like Richardson is doing or near the line of scrimmage however he couldn't make that one impactful play that would be proof to the other team and to his defense that a nose tackle would make that would give the rest of the defense the chance to dominate and to get off the field when they have to. 


 Interested Jet