NEWS: Rangers Winter Classic Alumni Roster

Update: Larry Brooks tweets that Mark Messier hopes to play in the game but has upcoming shoulder surgery

The team also tweeted that Mike Richter was going to check with his doctors to see if he can play.

Original Post

  • Goalies: John Vanbiesbrouck and Dan Blackburn,
  • Defensemen: Brian Leetch, Dave Maloney, Ron Greschner, Tom Laidlaw, Dale Purinton, Darius Kasparaitis and Mathieu Schneider
  • Forwards: Adam Graves, Glenn Anderson, Mike Gartner Darren Langdon, Stephane Matteau, Nick Kypreos, Darren Turcotte, Kris King, Brian Mullen, Paul Broten, Ron Duguay, Nick Fotiu and Pat Hickey.
  • Coaches: Mike Keenan, Emile Francis and Colin Campbell.
  • Off-Ice Ambassadors: Rod Gilbert, Ed Giacomin and Harry Howell.

Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

[blackbirdpie url="http://twitter.com/sbaickerCSN/status/140175409819041792"]

Brian Leetch #2 | Defenseman | 1987-2004
The 2009 Hockey Hall of Fame inductee skated in 1,129 games in 17 seasons with the Rangers, registering 240 goals and 741 assists for 981 points.  Leetch owns several franchise scoring records, including most career assists and the all-time leader in playoff assists (61) and points (89), and ranks second on the Blueshirts’ all-time scoring list.  He is a two-time Norris Trophy winner as the league’s top defenseman (’92, ’97), a Calder Memorial Trophy winner as the league’s top rookie (’89) and a two-time NHL First Team All-Star (’92, ’97).  During the 1993-94 season, Leetch became the only American-born player to be honored with the Conn Smythe Trophy as Most Valuable Player during the playoffs on his way to leading the Rangers to their first Stanley Cup Championship in 54 years.  The Corpus Christi, Texas native ranks second on the NHL’s all-time defenseman scoring list among American-born players behind Phil Housley, and is a silver medalist with Team USA at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Leetch’s No. 2 was retired at Madison Square Garden on January 24, 2008, becoming the fifth Ranger and first defenseman to join the select group.

Adam Graves #9 | Forward | 1991-2001
The two-time Rangers’ MVP (’93, ’94) skated in 772 games in 10 seasons as a Blueshirt, registering 280 goals and 227 assists for 507 points.  Graves played an instrumental role on the Rangers’ Stanley Cup team during the 1993-94 season, setting the franchise’s single season mark for most goals (52) en route to being named as a NHL Second Team All-Star.  He is a five-time winner of the Steven McDonald Extra Effort Award (’92, ’93, ’94, ’99, ’00), and has been honored as a King Clancy Memorial Trophy winner (’94), a Bill Masterton Trophy winner (’01) and the NHL Player Foundation award winner (’00).  Graves became the sixth player in Rangers history to have his number retired at Madison Square Garden on February 3, 2009.

Darren Langdon #15 | Forward | 1995-1999
Langdon skated in 277 games in six seasons with the Rangers, registering 14 goals and 15 assists for 29 points, along with 735 penalty minutes.  The Deer Lake, Newfoundland native is a two-time Players’ Player Award winner (’97, ’98).

Stephane Matteau #32 | Forward | 1994-1995
Matteau skated in 85 games in three seasons with the Rangers, registering 11 goals and 10 assists for 21 points, along with 49 penalty minutes.  The Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec native’s most memorable moment as a Ranger came in the Conference Finals of the 1994 Stanley Cup Championship run, when his double-overtime goal against the New Jersey Devils in Game 7 of the series sent the Blueshirts to the Stanley Cup Final.

Nick Kypreos #19 | Forward | 1993-1996
Kypreos skated in 128 games in three seasons with the Rangers, registering seven goals and 12 assists for 19 points, along with 272 penalty minutes.  The Toronto, Ontario native was a member of the Rangers’ 1994 Stanley Cup Championship team.

Glenn Anderson #36 | Forward | 1993-1994
The 2008 Hockey Hall of Fame inductee was a late-season acquisition by the Rangers during the team’s 1993-94 Stanley Cup Championship run, tallying four goals and two assists in 12 games with the Blueshirts.

Darren Turcotte #8 | Forward | 1988-1993
Turcotte skated in 325 games in six seasons with the Rangers, registering 122 goals and 133 assists for 255 points, along with 183 penalty minutes.  The Boston, Massachusetts native led the Blueshirts with a career-high, 32 goals in 1989-90, and was selected to participate in the NHL All-Star Game in 1991 after tallying a career-high, 41 assists and 67 points.

Dave Maloney #26 | Defenseman | 1974-1984
The youngest captain in franchise history skated in 605 games in 11 seasons with the Rangers, registering 70 goals and 225 assists for 295 points, along with 1,113 penalty minutes.  Maloney served as the 17th captain in Rangers history from October 11, 1978 to December 6, 1980, leading the team to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1979.  The Kitchener, Ontario native was originally selected by the Rangers in the first round, 14th overall, in the 1974 NHL Amateur Draft, and made his NHL debut at Madison Square Garden on December 18, 1974 as the youngest player ever to don the Blueshirt at 18 years and four months old.  Maloney, who was named Rangers MVP following the 1976-77 season, returned to the Blueshirts as the team’s radio color commentator in 2005.

Kris King #19 | Forward | 1989-1992
King skated in 249 games in four seasons with the Rangers, registering 27 goals and 33 assists for 60 points, along with 731 penalty minutes.  The Bracebridge, Ontario native was selected as the “Crumb Bum” Award winner in recognition of service to New York youngsters in 1991-92.

Brian Mullen #19 | Forward | 1987-1991
Mullen skated in 307 games in four seasons with the Rangers, registering 100 goals and 148 assists for 248 points, along with 188 penalty minutes.  He became the second native New Yorker after Nick Fotiu to play for the Rangers following a June 6, 1987, trade with Winnipeg.  Mullen made his only NHL All-Star appearance in the 1988-89 season, joining his brother, Joey Mullen, as part of the first American born brother combination to play in the same NHL All-Star Game.

Paul Broten #37 | Forward | 1989-1993
Broten skated in 194 games in four seasons with the Rangers, registering 27 goals and 33 assists for 60 points, along with 194 penalty minutes.  The Roseau, Minnesota native was originally selected by the Rangers in the fourth round, 77th overall, in the 1984 NHL Entry Draft.

John Vanbiesbrouck #34 | Goaltender | 1981-82; 1983-1993
The 2007 U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame inductee appeared in 449 games in 11 seasons with the Rangers, posting a record of 200-177-47, along with a 3.45 goals against average and 16 shutouts.  Vanbiesbrouck won his first NHL game for the Rangers at age 18, making 30 saves for a 2-1 victory over Colorado and becoming the fourth-youngest player to play for the Blueshirts at the time.  In 1985-86, he led all NHL goaltenders with 31 wins en route to capturing the Vezina Trophy as the league’s top goaltender and being selected as a NHL First Team All-Star.

Ron Greschner #4 | Defenseman | 1974-1990
A member of the Rangers for all 16 of his NHL seasons, Greschner registered 179 goals and 431 assists for 610 points, along with 1,226 penalty minutes in 982 games.  The NHL All-Star (’80) served as the 20th captain in Rangers history from October 9, 1986 to December 3, 1987.  Greschner, who surpassed the 20-goal mark four times and the 50-point plateau five times, retired as the Rangers’ all-time leader among defensemen in goals, assists and points (since broken by Brian Leetch) and currently ranks seventh on the Blueshirts all-time scoring list.

Tom Laidlaw #2 | Defenseman | 1980-1987
Laidlaw skated in 510 games in seven seasons with the Rangers, registering 20 goals and 99 assists for 119 points, along with 561 penalty minutes.  The Brampton, Ontario native is a two-time Players’ Player Award winner (’82, ’83).

 

Ron Duguay #10 | Forward | 1977-1983; 1986-1988
The NHL All-Star (’82) skated in 499 games in eight seasons with the Rangers, registering 164 goals and 176 assists for 340 points, along with 370 penalty minutes.  Duguay holds the Rangers record for fastest goal from the start of a game, tallying a goal 9 seconds into the game on April 6, 1980 at Philadelphia.  In 1981-82, he led the Rangers with a career-high, 40 goals and finished the season with a career-high, 76 points in 72 games.

Nick Fotiu #22 | Forward | 1976-1979; 1980-1985
The first player born and raised within New York’s five boroughs to play for the Rangers, Fotiu registered 41 goals and 62 assists for 103 points, along with 970 penalty minutes in 455 games in eight seasons as a Blueshirt.  He was honored with the Frank Boucher Trophy as the Rangers most popular player in 1981-82, and was selected as the “Crumb Bum” Award winner in recognition of service to New York youngsters in 1982-83.

Dale Purinton #5 | Defenseman | 2000-2004
Purinton skated in 181 games in five seasons with the Rangers, registering four goals and 16 assists for 20 points, along with 578 penalty minutes.  The Fort Wayne, Indiana native was originally selected by the Rangers in the fifth round, 117th overall, in the 1995 NHL Entry Draft.

Darius Kasparaitis #6 | Defenseman | 2002-2007
Kasparaitis skated in 215 games in four seasons with the Rangers, registering six goals and 28 assists for 34 points, along with 260 penalty minutes.  The four-time Olympian represented Russia at the 2006 Winter Olympic Games in Torino, Italy, while in the Rangers organization, and skated in the 2004 World Cup of Hockey.

Mathieu Schneider #25 | Defenseman | 1998-2000
Schneider skated in 155 games in two seasons with the Rangers, registering 20 goals and 44 assists for 64 points, along with 149 penalty minutes.  He made his Rangers debut on October 16, 1998 vs. the New Jersey Devils, following his trade from Toronto two days earlier.

Mike Gartner #22 | Forward | 1989-1994
The 2001 Hockey Hall of Fame inductee skated in 322 games in five seasons with the Rangers, registering 173 goals and 113 assists for 286 points, along with 231 penalty minutes.  Gartner reached the 40-goal mark in each of his three full seasons with the team, becoming the first player in Rangers history to do so.  In 1991-92, he became the first player in NHL history to register his 500th goal, his 500th assist and 1,000th point in the same season.  Gartner appeared in his sixth NHL All-Star Game, and only as a Ranger, in 1993, taking home MVP honors by scoring four goals.

Dan Blackburn #31 | Goaltender | 2001-2003
Blackburn appeared in 63 games in two seasons with the Rangers, posting a record of 20-32-4 with a 3.22 goals against average, .894 save percentage and one shutout.  The Blueshirts’ first round selection, 10th overall, in 2001, he was named to the NHL All-Rookie Team in 2001-02.  Blackburn was forced into early retirement in 2005 after suffering permanent nerve damage from a shoulder injury.

Pat Hickey #16 | Forward | 1975-1979; 1981-82
Hickey skated in 370 games in six seasons with the Rangers, registering 128 goals and 129 assists for 257 points, along with 216 penalty minutes.  The Brantford, Ontario native led the Blueshirts with a career-high, 40 goals during the 1977-78 season.  In 1976, Hickey left his mark on New York hockey by helping found the Ice Hockey in Harlem program, a non-profit community based organization for youth that uses the sport of hockey to promote academic achievement, responsibility, teamwork and good character.

Mike Keenan | 1993-94
Mike Keenan was named the 33rd head coach in Rangers history on April 17, 1993.  In his only season behind the Rangers bench, he led the team to the Presidents’ Trophy with a 52-24-8 (112 points) record and the franchise’s first Stanley Cup Championship in 54 years.  His .696 winning percentage during the 1994 championship run places him first all-time in team history, while his 16 playoff wins rank fourth despite only coaching the team for one season.

Emile Francis | 1964-1976
Emile Francis was a member of the Rangers organization for 13 years, serving as the fourth general manager in team history from 1964-65 to January 6, 1976 and head coach for 10 seasons across three different stints from 1965-1968, 1969-1973 and 1974-1975.  He is the Blueshirts’ all-time leader in games coached, wins and winning percentage, having posted a record of 342-208-103 (.602%) in 654 games behind the Rangers bench.  In addition, Francis is the franchise leader in all-time playoff games coached (75) and playoff wins (34).  Emile Francis was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a Builder in 1982.

Colin Campbell | 1994-1998
Colin Campbell was named the 34th head coach in Rangers history on August 10, 1994.  In four seasons behind the Rangers bench, he posted a record of 118-108-43 (.519%) in 269 games coached, as well as an 18-18 mark in 36 playoff games.  His 36 playoff games and 18 playoff wins rank third all-time in Rangers history.  Prior to becoming head coach, Campbell served as Associate Coach with the Rangers for three seasons, and was a part of the coaching staff on the 1993-94 Stanley Cup team.

Rod Gilbert | 1960-1977
A Rangers legend, Gilbert spent 15 full seasons with New York, skating in 1,065 games and tallying 406 goals and 615 assists and 1,021 points.  His 406 goals and 1,021 career points remain franchise records to this day, while his 615 assists are second only to Brian Leetch’s 741.  He also ranks third all-time with 1,065 games played. At the time of his retirement, his 1,021 points ranked second among right wingers in NHL history behind Gordie Howe.  Having played in eight NHL All-Star games (’64, ’65, ’67, ’69, ’70, ’72, ’75, ’77), his finest season came in 1971-72 when he registered 43 goals and 54 assists for 97 points and was named to the First NHL All-Star Team.  That season, he combined with Jean Ratelle and Vic Hadfield to form the renowned G-A-G Line (Goal-A-Game).  The three finished 3-4-5 in the NHL scoring race that season and led the Rangers to a berth in the Stanley Cup Finals.  He was also a Second All-Star Team selection in 1967-68.  In 1976, Gilbert won the Bill Masterton Trophy for perseverance and dedication to hockey.  He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982 and the Madison Square Garden Hall of Fame in 1984, and captured the Lester Patrick Award in 1991 for contributions to hockey in the United States.  Gilbert was also the first person in Rangers history to have his number retired, when his No. 7 was raised to the rafters of Madison Square Garden on October 14, 1979.

Ed Giacomin | 1965-1975
Always a fan favorite in New York, Giacomin spent over 10 seasons with the Rangers, appearing in 539 games and posting a 267-174-89 mark, along with a 2.73 goals against average and 49 shutouts.  On the Rangers all-time goaltending list, he ranks first overall in career shutouts (49), second in wins (267) and third in appearances (539).  The legendary goalie also ranks near the top of several single season Ranger records, tied for third in wins for a season (37 in 1968-69), tied for fourth in appearances for a season (70 in 1968-69 and 1969-70) and tied for sixth in shutouts for a season (9 in 1966-67).  Additionally, he ranks second for most 30-win seasons by a Ranger goalie, reaching the benchmark five times (1966-67, 1967-68, 1968-69, 1969-70, 1973-74).  Giacomin played in six NHL All-Star Games (’67, ’68, ’69, ’70, ’71, ’73), including five straight appearances from 1967 to 1971.  The netminder was selected as a First Team All-Star two times (’67, ’71), and was honored as a Second Team All-Star three times (’68, ’69, ’70).  In 1971, he was awarded the Vezina Trophy as the NHL’s top goaltender, sharing the honor with Gilles Villemure.  In addition to his puckstopping ability, Giacomin made Rangers history on March 19, 1972 when he became the first Blueshirt goalie to register a mulitple-point game with two assists vs. Toronto at Madison Square Garden.  He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1987, and became the second player in team history to have his number retired when the Rangers honored his No. 1 on March 15, 1989.

Harry Howell | 1952-1969
The benchmark for consistency and longevity, Harry Howell’s NHL career spanned 21 seasons, including an amazing 17 consecutive seasons in a Rangers uniform.  Howell skated in 1,160 games as a Blueshirt, registering 82 goals and 263 assists for 345 points.  His franchise record of 1,160 regular season games as a Ranger might never be broken.  Inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1979, Howell joined the team as a 19-year-old on October 18, 1952, recording a goal in his first NHL game.  Over the next 17 years, he became a fixture on defense for the Blueshirts, missing only 40 out of 1,200 regular-season games.  Having played in six NHL All-Star Games (’54, ’63, ’64, ’65, ’67, ’68), his finest season came in 1966-67 when he registered 12 goals and 28 assists for 40 points to capture the Norris Trophy as the league’s top defenseman and was selected to the NHL First All-Star Team.  Howell was the last player to win the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr won the award over the next eight seasons.  The former team Captain (’55 – ’57) was also honored as Rangers’ MVP in 1964, and is one of only four Rangers – along with Andy Bathgate, Rod Gilbert and Mark Messier – to have won the Frank Boucher Trophy three straight seasons (’65 – ’67).  Harry Howell became the second defenseman in Rangers history to have his number retired when his No. 3 was honored on February 22, 2009, at Madison Square Garden.

The Rangers have announced their roster for the Winter Classic alumni game:

RANGERS ROSTER SET FOR 2012 WINTER CLASSIC ALUMNI GAME AGAINST PHILADELPHIA FLYERS
New York, November 25, 2011 – The New York Rangers announced today their roster for the Rangers-Flyers alumni game on Saturday, December 31 at 1:00 p.m. at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as part of the 2012 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic.

The game will feature the return to the ice of Rangers greats Brian Leetch and Adam Graves.  Joining Leetch and Graves are Hockey Hall of Famers Glenn Anderson and Mike Gartner,

6 comments
Mike Dell Italia
Mike Dell Italia

How much would

They save if they cut the guy haven't heard his name called by an announcer in years and I'm not joking

cole3244
cole3244

its time eli chipped in.

Billy Suede
Billy Suede

@cole3244  how many times do you want eli to restructure? he's done it twice already.

TheTrueStork
TheTrueStork

@cole3244 Eli has restructured at least twice over the years, I believe.


Good for Kiwi.